Category Archives: season 26

Survival

Seven hundred and one episodes. Twenty-six years of television in the space of sixteen months. My epic journey through time and space with the iconic Doctor has finally reached its end (or, at least, its last major milestone). Survival is not a proper finale like you would expect these days (it’s not even a monotone finale like we had in 1969), but in its own way, it is rather poignant. It deals with the theme of survival, which is appropriate given the show was killed off. A harsh wilderness, survival of the fittest, survival of a planet, and survival of the Master. It’s Anthony Ainley’s final appearance as the Master, Sophie Aldred’s final appearance as Ace and the last time we see that iffy purple swirling galaxy.

The Master is more dangerous and unpredictable in his animal-like state. It’s something he wants rid of, but then learns to control it.

The Master is more dangerous and unpredictable in his animal-like state. It’s something he wants rid of, but then learns to control it.

Survival is not the best, but the continuation of Ace’s character-building that started earlier in the season is much appreciated and has hints of the modern style that the show now uses in its revived incarnation. Here, Ace returns to her home of Perivale to reunite with “the old gang”. There’s a kind of sadness to these scenes, of lost youth, good times that have passed, friends that have moved on, and things that will never be the same again. It’s relatable. Then they get abducted by a race of teleporting cheetah-people from a dying planet, and it becomes a bit less relatable.

Hale and Pace make a cameo appearance as shopkeepers, telling that joke about outrunning the lion, while the Doctor stocks up on cat food.

Hale and Pace make a cameo appearance as shopkeepers, telling that joke about outrunning the lion, while the Doctor stocks up on cat food.

Survival is quite a personal story. It’s not about some universe-ending disaster. Admittedly, the cheetah-people’s world is falling apart, but it’s really just a story about a group of people trying to escape, trying to stay human, the Master using the Doctor as bait, the Doctor trying to bring Ace back from the point of transformation, and Ace coming to terms with what it means to survive, developing a doomed friendship with Karra, and learning what she truly calls “home”.

The cheetah-people do look unfortunately cuddly for what are supposed to be scary hunters.

The cheetah-people do look unfortunately cuddly for what are supposed to be scary hunters.

Nevertheless, the ending does have a whiff of “we need a spectacular finish” to it. The exploding motorcycles are ridiculous (did the production have excess dynamite to use up?), more so that the Doctor survives the blast without a scratch! The final (brief) battle with the Master is like something out of Star Wars, but I did enjoy that. And the Doctor’s closing lines to Ace, about all the wonders of the Universe that are still out there for them to see, are very nicely done, and really hammers home that this is the end. I understand this speech was a late addition once the producers knew it was all over. Although Sylvester McCoy would return to TV as the Doctor a couple more times, this is basically the end of his run, and I will have more to say about him shortly.

The alien planet is well-realised for its time, using digital video effects.

The alien planet is well-realised for its time, using digital video effects.

For now, I finish the main bulk of my Doctor Who marathon with a sort of sadness that it’s all over. I never experienced it on its first broadcast, so I can only imagine what it must have been like for the fans still tuning in every week to suddenly realise it was to be no more. Although there are still hints of the cheesy old pantomime / stage drama style, the show’s twenty-sixth season has seen it turn into something vastly improved. Had it continued, I could well imagine a gradual transition into the 2005 series, and I would have traced that change back to here. Alas, it seems the show was not fast enough to adapt, and thus not fit to survive.

“There are worlds out there where the sky is burning, where the sea’s asleep and the rivers dream, people made of smoke and cities made of song. Somewhere there’s danger, somewhere there’s injustice and somewhere else the tea is getting cold. Come on, Ace, we’ve got work to do.”

The Curse of Fenric

It’s hard to believe that, just two seasons ago, I was watching the Rani in a wig and a space bus full of rock ‘n’ roll tourists. Somebody obviously woke up and realised Doctor Who needed to be a bit more serious and sophisticated, and The Curse of Fenric is the high point so far. Well, it’s as sophisticated as a TV show can be when it features vampires, ancient viking curses and a man who travels in a police box, while still being accessible family viewing.

Dr. Judson and his ULTIMA machine are clearly based on Alan Turing and the Enigma machine. I'm not sure the Enigma machine ran on poisonous green gooey artifacts, though.

Dr. Judson and his ULTIMA machine are clearly based on Alan Turing and the Enigma machine. I’m not sure the Enigma machine ran on poisonous green gooey artifacts, though.

The cast is mostly terrific. Nicholas Parsons is great as the reverend struggling with his faith amidst the violent backdrop of World War II. Alfred Lynch plays Millington, a slightly unhinged naval commander, and although he comes across as a bit “Poundland Gary Oldman”, it’s a classy performance anyway. Some of the extras are cringeworthy, but Ace is definitely improving and her scenes with the Doctor are, hands down, the best so far.

In a sci-fi twist on a legend, it's not the crucifix that keeps vampires away, it's the psychic barrier caused by unwavering faith. Sure, why not?

In a sci-fi twist on a legend, it’s not the crucifix that keeps vampires away, it’s the psychic barrier caused by unwavering faith. Sure, why not?

There’s some solid drama and emotion here. It’s as if the writers have suddenly realised Ace should be an actual character rather than a box to tick and could have important parts of the plot dedicated to her. The revelations about her mother, about her past and the time storm that stranded her on another world are, admittedly, a little messy, but they’re appreciated. Her rant about the Doctor not telling anybody what he knows is absolutely superb and completely true, and the whole exchange is really well done by both McCoy and Aldred. It’s the best scene in years, frankly; I even mouthed “wow” when it was over. Ace is growing up.

I almost expected her to stay behind with the Russian bloke, but that would have been a poor conclusion.

I almost expected her to stay behind with the Russian bloke, but that would have been a poor conclusion.

The WWII setting is great; it’s not an overused era on this show, surprisingly, and I enjoy all the code-breaking enigma machine type stuff. Even the “vampires” are more interesting than usual, being “haemovores” from Earth’s far future, and the prosthetics on the uglier ones are really excellent. It’s well-made, it looks good, it seems to be shot on location and, as expected, there are plenty more explosions.

It's not the first Doctor Who story to feature creatures rising from the water, but it is the best.

It’s not the first Doctor Who story to feature creatures rising from the water, but it is the best.

The only real problems I had with this one are in the choppy plotting and editing. Too many pointless things happening for no real reason. Ace climbing down a ladder to escape a haemovore attack, only to have to climb back up again. Reverend Wainwright finding his faith for all of five seconds, then losing it again. Fenric’s inability to resist a chess puzzle for some reason. The ancient haemovore deciding to side with the Doctor in a scene that feels like it was written in and inserted later. It’s not a problem exclusive to this serial – it happens a lot through the long running of this show – but it’s more apparent here where everything else is at a much higher standard. And if this is the standard that Doctor Who had reached in 1989, it’s even more of a shame that it wasn’t allowed to continue. Or, then again, maybe that was for the best in the end.

One more left.

Ghost Light

Much like Warriors’ Gate, I think I would have enjoyed Ghost Light more if I had a better idea of what was happening! I did get the gist of it, that an alien survey had materialised on Earth to catalogue all of its species, much like the expeditions of the 19th century, and I enjoyed the parallels with the preserved animals around the house. And the “ghost in the basement” idea is nothing new, but it works.

A policeman investigates the disappearance of the house's original occupants.

A policeman investigates the disappearance of the house’s original occupants.

Where things start getting fuzzy is with the other residents and their relationship with ‘Light’, their motivations, and what exactly the ‘husks’ are. I could probably watch Ghost Light twice and still not quite understand it; the flow of information is bitty and muddled. Having just read a plot synopsis, I’m sorry to say that most of it flew over my head. It’s not that it makes no sense, it’s just poorly explained on screen. At one point, the Doctor even claims he can’t keep up with everything that’s going on himself. It is at least quite a clever script with playful use of themes like evolution and preservation, and it wraps it up in the tropes of a horror story.

Husks in the dark. I have no idea.

Husks in the dark. I have no idea.

It’s also quite well made, with moody lighting and haunting music. Ace gets a more prominent role in the plot, referencing a traumatic childhood event that occurred in this house 100 years later (ah, time travel!). Exploring the backstory of the Doctor’s companion is something the modern series does as its core premise these days, but it was more of a rarity back then. It’s a good thing, but it doesn’t have much impact on this story in the end, and Sophie Aldred doesn’t have the acting chops to make it work. Sylvester McCoy continues to impress, however.

'Light', appearing in angelic form, wakes up from his dormant state to sort everything out.

‘Light’, appearing in angelic form, wakes up from his dormant state to sort everything out.

I suppose it’s a credit to Ghost Light that I did enjoy it despite being lost and confused throughout. Some of it is just “weird for weird’s sake”, but there’s some subtle and disturbing horror too (the soup!), as well as some tragic moments. Light being defeated by his fear of change is the perfect Doctor Who ending, really.

Battlefield

It’s the final season and it would seem intent on going out with a bang. The use of explosives is becoming a bit of a joke now, but Battlefield is the show’s attempt at doing an “epic”, with transdimensional medieval knights facing off against UNIT’s military forces in a large-scale skirmish, while an evil sorceress summons an all-consuming demon. Granted, it ends up looking like a strange war reinactment documentary, but for a BBC show recorded on video in 1989, it’s not bad going.

Morgaine and Mordred study the land. Only one can be the hammiest!

Morgaine and Mordred study the land. Only one can be the hammiest!

Battlefield certainly isn’t bad but when the premise is that the legend of King Arthur is from a parallel dimension and a thousand year old war is brought to Earth, you have to expect a bit of hokiness. Larger than life characters speaking of glory and honour in olde worlde tongues, evil cackling laughs and technology dressed up as magic. It’s sometimes a bit much to take seriously, however I do like Mordred and Ancelyn – they have a certain charm to them; it’s like watching a scene from Thor. The Destroyer is your typical overblown world-destroying monster, but it is an impressive piece of puppetry and costuming.

The Destroyer, entrapped by silver shackles.

The Destroyer, entrapped by silver shackles.

While archeologists dig up old fossils, another fossil is dug up out of retirement and squeezed back into uniform for one last hurrah. The Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart has a way of enhancing any story he’s in, and he has some great moments in this too, particularly reminiscing with the Doctor. Despite the change of actor, the Doctor and the Brig have good screen chemistry. There could have been a bit more friction between him and the new Brigadier (played by Angela Bruce). I particularly liked the exchange in which he confesses to not understanding women, in which the Doctor replies “don’t worry, people will be shooting at you soon”. I half-expected him to die by the end of the story, going out in a blaze of glory, but found myself relieved that he survived the ordeal. It’s a good end for him.

The Brigadier threatens to kill Morgaine's son Mordred. Unlike the Doctor, his threat is not an empty one.

The Brigadier threatens to kill Morgaine’s son Mordred. Unlike the Doctor, his threat is not an empty one.

Battlefield also stirs up some nostalgia with the surprise return of Bessie the car, but what I wasn’t expecting was a memory dug up from my own childhood. I have a recollection of the “chalk circle” scene; I have definitely seen it before. My mind has mangled that up with memories of Remembrance of the Daleks but I wasn’t entirely sure this scene was also from Doctor Who. Now I know it was. It makes me wonder what else I saw at age six that has been burned into my impressionable mind, before the show finally went off the air. Not much, probably.

It's funny what sticks in your head as a child. I have no memory of the Destroyer, but I definitely remember this.

It’s funny what sticks in your head as a child. I have no memory of the Destroyer, but I definitely remember this.

The idea of the Doctor being Merlin is handled with a slight twist: it’s not a case of mistaken identity, rather it’s something he hasn’t done yet. A future incarnation of the Doctor was Merlin, and he even leaves himself a note. That’s quite clever. For a time-traveller, there ought to be this sort of thing happening more often. Speaking of the future, the whole story is a few years ahead of the ‘present’, as evidenced by the pub charging five pounds for a lemonade, and their telephone being voice-activated. We’re not far off that now, are we?

Ace rises from the water holding Excalibur. Oh-ho, I see what they did there!

Ace rises from the water holding Excalibur. Oh-ho, I see what they did there!

Battlefield is nothing special, but it’s perfectly fine. It’s got some elements of the show’s dafter past, with mad villains and monsters, but it’s good fun.